<g>

<g> (character or glyph) represents a glyph, or a non-standard character. [5. Characters, Glyphs, and Writing Modes]
Modulegaiji
AttributesAttributes att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.analytic (@ana)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
refpoints to a description of the character or glyph intended.
Status Optional
Datatype
Member of
Contained by
analysis: interp m pc w
dictionaries: form
header: idno
msdescription: locus msName origDate
textcrit: lem rdg
textstructure: dateline docImprint
transcr: am line zone
May containCharacter data only
Declaration
element g
{
   tei_att.global.attributes,
   tei_att.typed.attributes,
   attribute ref { text }?,
   text
}
Example
<g ref="#ctlig">ct</g>
This example points to a glyph element with the identifier ctlig like the following:
<glyph xml:id="ctlig">
<!-- here we describe the particular ct-ligature intended -->
</glyph>
Example
<g ref="#per-glyph">per</g>
The medieval brevigraph per could similarly be considered as an individual glyph, defined in a glyph element with the identifier per-glyph as follows:
<glyph xml:id="per-glyph">
<!-- ... -->
</glyph>
Note

The name g is short for gaiji, which is the Japanese term for a non-standardized character or glyph.